Keep your hunting safe and legal

trespassing laws in MO
Safe hunting!

Long before children knew and loved the story of Bambi, his ancestors helped to save the lives of our Founding Fathers. 

That’s right! Without deer meat, the Plymouth Colony may not have survived their first few harsh New England winters. In fact, in 1621  Indian Chief Massasoit brought 90 men to the first Thanksgiving feast! In order to feed them, they provided 5 deer with their hunting skills. No licenses, no hunter safety classes — it was open season all winter long.

Times have changed! If you’re  bringing home the venison for Thanksgiving this year,  you’ll need to have your “ducks in a row”.

Let’s start with the legal part.  The main crime hunters commit is trespassing on private property. What about a Class B misdemeanor on your record?  If the judge decides against you,  you could face jail time!  Your family would miss you and your venison on Thanksgiving Day.

Then, imagine how losing your hunting license  for a year and forking out some hard earned dollars in fines would further dampen your grateful spirit!  That’s the penalty for trespassing while hunting.

Trespassing truth — even if you shoot your deer on legal ground, you can’t retrieve your kill if the deer runs a few feet and dies on someone else’s property.  Maybe diplomacy will help.   Contact the property owner.  There’s a nice chance they’d rather not deal with disposing of the carcass themselves.  Hopefully, they will also appreciate the fact that you didn’t choose to trespass on their property.

If that fails, well, you’ll just have to keep hunting!

Keep your eyes peeled for purple paint! Purple paint markers or “no trespassing signs” are the responsibility of the property owner. It’s their job to let you know their property’s boundaries, according to the  Missouri Department of Conservation.

https://mdc.mo.gov/newsroom/know-trespassing-laws-during-deer-season

Gun safety is a given.  if you’re a licensed hunter, you already know the rules, right?

Still, accidents happen to the best of us. The worst kind of accident involves not just injuring yourself — but injuring someone else, also!

Someone I know decided to fake target practice in his bedroom mirror. Said mirror shattered since the supposedly unloaded gun had a bullet left inside. Thankfully, no one was hurt!   Just a youthful mistake could have caused serious injury or death.

What Dad said is still true. Guns are not toys! 

So keep an eye on the kid who is enamored with your hunting gear and weapons.  Teach them early the basic gun safety rules.

  • Check your unloaded weapon to make sure it is in good working order.
  • Never point a gun at a peaceful person, even if it’s not loaded.
  • Keep your trigger-happy finger OFF the trigger until time to shoot.
  • Don’t climb trees or run with a loaded gun (unless you’re GI Joe).

if you are involved in a hunting accident,  don’t add a Class A misdemeanor to your misery!

Here’s how to stay out of jail  and enjoy Thanksgiving dinner (maybe even venison roast) with your family, courtesy of the Missouri Department of Conservation.

“If you are involved in a firearms-related hunting accident, the law requires that you identify yourself and render assistance. Failure to do so is a Class A misdemeanor.”  ( https://huntfish.mdc.mo.gov)

If you are in need of legal defense due to a hunting accident or trespassing charges,  The Law Offices of Nathan A. Steimel, LLC will give you a free initial consultation.  http://steimel-law.com/

Attorney Steimel knows your rights and is well-versed in Missouri laws.   Call for help today!  636-244-3737

This website is designed for general information only. The information presented on this site should not be construed to be formal legal advice or the formation of a lawyer/client relationship.

 

 

 

What the “911 Good Samaritan Law” means for you…

Illegal drug use can change a family or friendship forever!

None of us make it through life without some scars.  Some wounds will never quite heal. Losing a friend or family member to the lifestyle of drug abuse has to be one of life’s most difficult wounds to heal — especially if the death was preventable.

Which is one reason why the 2014 death of Cynthia Byersmith’s son Craig is so tragic.

Surrounded by people at a party in Missouri,  no one was willing to call 911 when Craig aspirated his own vomit due to a heroin overdose in 2014.   Why? The partygoers knew they would be busted because drugs and drug paraphenalia were present at the party.

According to the Springfield News-Leader reporter Jackie Rehwald,  Beyersmith believes her son Craig may have died needlessly.  If someone had called 911 promptly or given Craig the opiod overdose antidote Narcan, quite possibly his life could have been saved.

Sadly, they chose to let their “friend” die rather than suffer jail time (although they may still be in jail at this time). Why?  Even a simple heroin possession charge in Missouri is a Class C felony.

What does a Class C felony mean to you?

It includes a potentional penalty of seven long years in jail and heavy fines.  If you get the minimum sentence of probation, you will need to complete a  drug treatment program, according to FindLaw.com.  http://statelaws.findlaw.com/missouri-law/missouri-heroin-laws.html

In real life, finding a good job is a slim chance with a Class C felony on your records.

In real life, you may have to move back in with Mom and Dad,  a kind friend, or face being homeless and jobless.

Real life can be very difficult to face!   Still, what could be worse than facing the haunting memory that you let someone die because you were afraid to call 911?

In August of 2017, the 911 Good Samaritan Law went into effect in Missouri. This law does not encourge drug use. Instead, it provides a way to cry for help if you or friends you are with have made poor choices involving drug possession.

How does this law intended to help in a situation like Craig’s? According to the News-Leader article here are some ways this new law helps.  http://www.news-leader.com/story/news/local/ozarks/2017/08/26/new-law-offers-some-legal-protection

  • For someone who calls 911 to report drug overdose emergencies, they will not be charged with drug possession or paraphenalia charges.
  • If someone administers Narcane to an overdose victim, then immediately calls 911 for help for the victim, they will not be charged with a crime.

The 911 Good Samaritan Law also applies not just to opiods but to any controlled substance, including alcohol.

Parents, do I hear a sigh of relief? Be aware! Be informed. Know your rights.

This allows for something we all need at one time or another:  a second chance at life.

If you or someone you love is facing drug charges in Missouri, you need the help of an experienced criminal defense attorney!  You need a second chance, too — the best possible outcome!

Facing drug charges? Get a free initial legal consultaton. Find out how you or a loved one can get affordable, quality legal defense.  Get your second chance by calling The Law Offices of Nathan A. Steimel, LLC. 636-244-3737

http://steimel-law.com/criminal-defense.html

This website is designed for general information only. The information presented on this site should not be construed to be formal legal advice or the formation of a lawyer/client relationship.

 

 

 

YOU can help prevent accidental teen drug overdose

Beware! Prescription drugs are a leading cause of accidental drug overdose!

A visit from family isn’t supposed to be your worst nightmare come true!  But what if they arrive with “extra baggage”, a.k.a, prescription medications?

Years ago, my husband’s elderly grandmother came for a lengthy visit. We felt the visit went well after we safely delivered her to her home.

Then we discovered our preschool- aged daughter in our guest room with a pill in her hand.  Our hearts nearly stopped when we realized she could have swallowed that pill — prescription heart meds.  One pill accidentally dropped on the floor could have ended in tragedy! After a total cleaning and vacuuming of the room, our hands stopped shaking.

Today she’s sporting a new set of braces and wincing in pain.  Yes, she needs pain meds, though not the prescription type.

She’s almost a teen. Still, we’re not keen on giving her unlimited access to the Tylenol bottle.  Like any responsible parent, we’re painfully aware of the epidemic of drug experimentation and usage among teens.  We dole out her pain meds personally.

Did you know that more deaths each year occur due to accidental drug overdoses  than car accidents? 

The Centers for Disease Control states that 91 Americans die every day from drug overdoses.  https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/epidemic/index.html

It’s a problem that’s not going away. In fact, the CDC says that drug overdose deaths have quadrupled in the past fifteen years. That’s astounding!

Sometimes accidental overdose happens with the chronically ill or the elderly who mix up the times, amounts, or combinations of prescription meds.

However, for the young and restless, accidental drug overdose is more often a case of foolish experimentation or pressure from friends.

According to a 2013 survey reported on WebMD,  more than 5 million teens admitted to abusing prescription drugs. http://www.webmd.com/parenting/news/20130423/prescription-drug-abuse-up-among-us-teens-survey#1

What’s a parent to do?

  • Keep a close eye on and find a safe place for prescription pain meds in the house. A locked cupboard is a great idea!  As cancer and other chronic illnesses are on the rise,  pain meds are necessary and more accessible.  Even common injuries can spawn leftover pain meds.  It may be time to double check and empty out your stash.  Many police departments have a “no questions asked” drop off box for extra prescription meds.
  • Talk to your teen. (Use bribery like pizza and ice cream, but just do it!) Let them know that pain meds and alchohol don’t mix — it’s enough to slow or even stop your body from breathing.  Talk about toxic drug mixes.  Talk about drinking, drugs, and driving. Ignorance is not bliss!  If you have grave concerns, find an EMT or police officer who sees the havoc and heartbreak of drug overdoses on a first- hand basis. Ask if they will deliver straight talk to your teen.
  • Get to know your teen’s friends. This takes time and careful planning. We’re not just talking cyber-spying. (All’s fair in love and war, though).  Be fun and friendly!
  • Set the example.  Treat prescription drugs like a loaded gun, not a party favor.  Only use as necessary.
  • Tell your teen about Missouri’s  new “Good Samaritan Law” which passed in May of 2017. If you or someone you love calls 911 to report a drug overdose, they will not be charged with drug possession! This is a potential life-saver!

No one wants their child to be the next drug overdose statistic!

What if you or someone you love has already “blown it”? Facing drug charges in Missouri? You need the help of an experienced, local criminal defense attorney. http://steimel-law.com/criminal-defense.html

 You wlil find Attorney Steimel has extensive legal knowledge and will aggressively fight for your rights in court.

Call The Law Offices of Nathan A. Steimel, LLC today for a free initial consultation.  (636)244-3737

This website is designed for general information only. The information presented on this site should not be construed to be formal legal advice or the formation of a lawyer/client relationship.